The Future of Friending
Apr04

The Future of Friending

Facebook and other social media give a resonant voice to more people. By Kris Dreessen Facebook allows users to see what their friends across town are thinking and learn about the life of a Serengeti safari guide with little more than a click. Since its launch in 2004, Facebook has grown to more than 2 billion monthly users worldwide. More voice to more people is a key tenet of the company’s philosophy,” says Facebook’s director of...

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Grit is Not Enough
Apr04

Grit is Not Enough

It isn’t enough to be strong and resolute. We all need each other’s help. In the past year, I’ve read a torrent of articles and papers about college students. Two concepts receiving considerable attention are the traits of grit and resilience. I’ve read how the lack of these qualities has purportedly left today’s students ill-equipped to succeed. I’ve read about college student “snowflakes” who, according to a Washington Post op-ed,...

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Chenussio
Apr04

Chenussio

A glimpse into the past. Distinguished Professor of History Michael Leroy Oberg looks at a map dated 1771 and can’t help but wonder. What was life like back then? — when Geneseo was known as “Chenussio,” a Seneca Iroquois town along the Genesee River. Trails through the woods — forerunners to Ridge Road, Route 20A and others — connected the Senecas with their Haudenosaunee kin in the “Land of the Iroquois.” People were constantly...

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Breaking the Chains
Apr01

Breaking the Chains

Activists — including those from the Geneseo community — are using lessons from history to combat modern slavery and galvanize communities. An estimated 40.3 million people are in some form of modern slavery in 167 countries worldwide, according to the 2017 Global Slavery Index, published by the Walk Free Foundation, which works towards ending modern slavery. Some 50 percent are in forced labor, and 25 percent of slaves are children...

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Impact in Ecuador
Dec01

Impact in Ecuador

In the Ecuadorian Amazon, members of the Sarayaku Kichwa live in harmony with “Pachamama,” or Mother Earth. When workers from the national oil company of Ecuador flew a prospecting helicopter onto their land in 2007, the Sarayaku protested against drilling and fought to protect their way of life, winning their case in an international court in 2012.

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Change in  Perspective
Dec01

Change in Perspective

A week before this past August’s “Great American Eclipse,” Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy Anne Pellerin gave a community talk about the event at Wadsworth Library in Geneseo. “There were 5-year-old kids, there were elderly people — all ages, just being excited about science,” says Pellerin. That energy carries her: “It’s what wakes me up in the morning, and is really why I’m doing that job as a teacher. I want to share the excitement.”

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Climate Change: Is It Too Late?
Dec01

Climate Change: Is It Too Late?

Journalist, activist and professor Bill McKibben’s book, “The End of Nature,” is considered to be the first book about climate change that was written for general audiences. Its message has been translated into 24 languages. The founder of 350.org, he has worked around the world with grassroots organizations to fight climate change and to work toward divesting from fossil fuels. He has received the Gandhi Peace Prize for his efforts.

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